My Last Reflection Before Leaving Law for the Ministry

The following was my last contribution to The Jere Beasley Report, the long-time publication of my former law firm that I was honored and truly blessed to call my home for nearly a decade.  I was fortunate enough to be asked to submit my favorite Bible verse in the regular section of The Report. It can be accessed on page 33 of the online edition.

My favorite verse since I was a teenager are the following words of Christ that have pierced my soul since I first read them: “For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world and forfeit his soul?” (Mark 8:36). These words of Christ have forever been seared in my mind as a reminder that life is not about money, power, or self-gain, but is about losing ourselves to His will. Namely, this is serving our neighbors by showing our love through acts of service, which demonstrate the faith we have in trusting—truly trusting—that our Creator has redeemed us to serve others.

Many have asked why I am going into the ministry. It is not because formal ministry is “more holy” but due to a call placed on my heart. It was an irresistible call and one I was not looking for but no matter who we are, or where we are, we are called to serve others as we are and in our careers. It is our vocation to be fathers, mothers, husbands, wives, employees, and ultimately Christbearers to all we encounter. I urge the reader to understand that it is not a higher calling to go into the ministry as we are all minsters in our own locations to each and every one we encounter each and every day. Look around you. The people you work with, befriend, and love are those whom you minister to and to whom minister to you. They bear the image of God and as C.S. Lewis so eloquently put:

“There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations—these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub and exploit—immortal horrors or everlasting splendors.”

-C . S . Lewis “The Weight of Glory”

Treasure those immortal souls who are around you and protect your own soul by selflessly serving them. Serve others by relinquishing the burdens of this world and casting your trust on the One who created the world, Jesus the Christ. God bless you all in your own ministries wherever you are.

Uncommon Prayer Continues…

Moreover, although the 1662 did not please all sides in the Church of England, it reflected not a mix-and-match theology but a coherent and consistent one: the theology the Book of Common Prayer shares with the Articles and the Homilies. Listening to Jefferies discuss the ACNA 2019 prayer book leaves me only more confused regarding the relationship between this book and the 1662 prayer book.

(Emphasis mine). Read the whole article here from The North American Anglican and take a listen to the podcast episode in question here.

I am still digesting the ACNA Book of Common Prayer and gathering my thoughts. There are a few things I can say as of now: 1) common prayer remains dead in Anglicanism (the ACNA Diocese of Quincy, who former Bishop is on the ACNA Liturgy Task Force, will be using the the English Common Worship instead of the 2019 ACNA BCP);  2) the ACNA book is a step in the right direction away from the 1979 TEC BCP (the ACNA 2019 BCP is an evolution rather than a revolution as my friend Canon Isaac Rehberg has aptly noted); 3) there are aspects in this evolution that I love and aspects I absolutely hate; and 4) I remain convinced the REC Modern Language 2003 BCP should have been used as the base text with minimal alterations and the publication of a simultaneous Book of Occasional Services could address any optional offices.

Those interested in a good overview of the changes to the 2019 ACNA BCP should take a look at Drew Nathaniel Keane’s prior article on the topic and I recommend Canon Rehberg’s article expressing the concerns that the 1979 TEC BCP was used as the starting point for ACNA’s own BCP.

Now available: another episode of the “Miserable Offenders” podcast – on a book by Peter Toon

Oh yeah forgot to share the news on the Miserable Offenders front! H/t to Prydain Blog.

Prydain

From our friends at The North American Anglican, here is the latest episode of their podcast, Miserable Offenders.  In this episode, Jesse Nigro and Fr. Isaac Rehberg introduce any newcomers to Toon and his legacy, as they begin reading and discussing his book in defense of the classical Book of Common Prayer, “Knowing God Through the Liturgy.” As usual this podcast is worth the listen, and being an admirer of Fr. Peter Toon, I certainly commend this discussion to you.  (On Apple Podcasts it can be found here.)

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The Great Charge: Recovering the Principles of Biblical Preaching

An excellent piece from The Anglican Expositor. May all those licensed to preach in the Anglican church have ears to hear.

The Anglican Expositor

In the second epistle to his young protégé, Timothy, St. Paul gave a solemn charge that should resonate loudly with North American Anglicans in the early Twenty-first Century:

I charge thee therefore before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom; Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all longsuffering and doctrine. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables. (2 Tim 4:1-4)

For many of us Anglicans who label ourselves orthodox, conservative, or traditionalist those words from the pen of St. Paul immediately catch our attention and probably prompt most of us to think of heterodox…

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