ACNA 2019 BCP Finalized

You can review the final text on the website.  Unfortunately, the Family Prayer section continues to follow the 1979 TEC BCP and did not incorporate the reforms I proposed based on the 1928 BCP, which in turn was based upon Bishop Edmund Gibson’s original work.

Additionally, the ACNA Liturgy Task Force did not restore “miserable offenders” to the general confession in the daily office.  I am genuinely curious what the task force thoughts were regarding the feedback it received prior to the deadline last November.

I will refrain from rendering a judgment until after I have a copy to review and use it for a sufficient period of time. Based upon the trial texts it is an improvement on the 1979 TEC BCP, but I must continue to lament that the task force did not start with the 2003 REC Modern Language BCP and then work from there in adding services where needed.  Then the BCP could have been kept relatively small and additional services could have been published as a Book of Occasional Services, which the REC has done and was common in the past.

One last note, since women’s ordination has not been addressed by ACNA, it is curious the 2019 BCP would be formerly adopted since the Ordinal would need to be amended if ACNA restores a male-only priesthood and/or diaconate.

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Remain within the bookends

It is good to see Archbishop Robinson, of the UECNA, blogging again in this latest installment from The North American Anglican. It is a great reflection on Anglican theology in a time in which many seem to pick and choose what their “Anglicanism” in a manner that reflects choosing your flavor of ice cream.

In the end, picking one’s own flavor has one end result: your faith turns out to be a mirror and you are worshiping yourself.

Fight for the formularies. Fight for the faith once delivered. Stay between the bookends.

Be miserable in the new year

With the return of the Miserable Offenders Podcast, presented by the fine people of The North American Anglican.

Episode 6 dropped today on iTunes and other podcast services or may be streamed at the TNAA website. Additionally, be sure to like the new Facebook page for the podcast and subscribe and rate us on iTunes.

‘Tis the Season

For the Athanasian Creed. A classic from the late great Fr. Peter Toon, The Athanasian Creed & the PECUSA.

I hope this Christmas you are in a congregation that recites this historic and orthodox exposition on the incarnation of Christ and the Holy Trinity. Here is the text from the Proposed 1928 Church of England revision:

AT MORNING PRAYER.

Upon these Feasts; Christmas-Day, the Epiphany, Saint Matthias, Easter-Day, Ascension-Day, Whit-Sunday, Saint John Baptist, Saint James, Saint Bartholomew, Saint Matthew, Saint Simon and Saint Jude, Saint Andrew, and upon Trinity-Sunday, shall be sung or said at Morning Prayer, instead of the Apostles’ Creed, this Confession of our Christian Faith, commonly called The Creed of Saint Athanasius, by the Minister and people standing. 

QUICUNQUE VULT.

WHOSOEVER would be saved : needeth before all things to hold fast the Catholick Faith.
2 Which Faith except a man keep whole and undefiled : without doubt he will perish eternally.

    3 Now the Catholick Faith is this : that we worship one God in Trinity, and the Trinity in Unity;
4 Neither confusing the Persons : nor dividing the substance.
5 For there is one Person of the Father, another of the Son : another of the Holy Ghost;
6 But the Godhead of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost is all one : the glory equal, the majesty co-eternal.
7 Such as the Father is, such is the Son : and such is the Holy Ghost.
8 The Father uncreated, the Son uncreated : the Holy Ghost uncreated;
9 The Father infinite, the Son infinite : the Holy Ghost infinite;
10 The Father eternal, the Son eternal : the Holy Ghost eternal.
11 And yet there are not three eternals : but one eternal
12 As also there are not three uncreated, nor three infinites : but one infinite, and one uncreated.
13 So likewise the Father is almighty, the Son almighty : the Holy Ghost almighty;
14 And yet there are not three almighties : but one almighty.
15 So the Father is God, the Son God : the Holy Ghost God;
16 And yet there are not three Gods : but one God.
17 So the Father is Lord, the Son Lord : the Holy Ghost Lord;
18 And yet there are not three Lords : but one Lord.
19 For like as we are compelled by the Christian verity : to confess each Person by himself to be both God and Lord;
20 So are we forbidden by the Catholick religion : to speak of three Gods or three Lords.
21 The Father is made of none : nor created, nor begotten.
22 The Son is of the Father alone : not made, nor created, but begotten.
23 The Holy Ghost is of the Father and the Son : not made, nor created, nor begotten, but proceeding.
24 There is therefore one Father, not three Fathers; one Son, not three Sons : one Holy Ghost, not three Holy Ghosts.
25 And in this Trinity there is no before or after : no greater or less;
26 But all three Persons are co-eternal together : and co-equal.
27 So that in all ways, as is aforesaid : both the Trinity is to be worshipped in Unity, and the Unity in Trinity.
28 He therefore that would be saved let him thus think of the Trinity.

    29 FURTHERMORE it is necessary to eternal salvation : that he also believe faithfully the Incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ.
30 Now the right faith is that we believe and confess : that our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is both God and man.
31 He is God, of the substance of the Father, begotten before the worlds : and he is man, of the substance of his Mother, born in the world;
32 Perfect God : perfect man, of reasoning soul and human flesh subsisting;
33 Equal to the Father as touching his Godhead : less than the Father as touching his manhood.
34 Who although he be God and man : yet he is not two, but is one Christ ;
35 One however, not by conversion of Godhead into flesh : but by taking manhood into God;
36 One altogether : not by confusion of substance, but by unity of person.
37 For as reasoning soul and flesh is one man : so God and man is one Christ;
38 Who suffered for our salvation : descended into hell, rose again from the dead;
39 Ascended into heaven, sat down at the right hand of the Father : from whence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.
40 At whose coming all men must rise again with their bodies : : and hail give account for their own deeds.
41 And they that have done good will go into life eternal : they that have done evil into eternal fire.

    42 THIS is the Catholick Faith : which except a man do faithfully and steadfastly believe, he cannot be saved.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son : and to the Holy Ghost;
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be world without end. Amen.

 

Great Article on Family Prayer and an Announcement

The Rev. Dcn. Parker has authored a brilliant article on utilizing the full version of the daily offices but in an abbreviated manner (as allowed by the rubrics) to better facilitate family prayer.

The readers of this blog will recall my focus on using the Catechism, Family Prayer, 39 Articles, and other sections of the 1928 American and 2003 REC Prayer Books to facilitate family devotions.  As Dcn. Parker points out, Bishop Edmund Gibson authored a booklet of family devotions that were minimally adopted in creating the Family Prayer Offices in the 1928 American and 2003 REC Prayer Books.  These offices are greatly abbreviated and lack liturgical responses that would be more engaging for the family.  However, the abbreviated version of the full daily offices Dcn. Parker writes about do include responses that are more engaging for the entire family (or church small group for that matter).

I fully endorse and strongly recommend families use the abbreviated office that Dcn. Parker references in his article.  He is to be commended for “doing the math” and condensing the office (as allowed by the Prayer Book) into a shorter form and publishing this office for the church to use within their home.  A copy of the condensed office may be found at the bottom of the article at The North American Anglican or here.

Speaking of Bishop Edmund Gibson and his work, Family Devotion; or an Exhortation to Morning and Evening Prayers in Families, I have submitted for publication a book that takes the abbreviated daily offices and prayers from Bishop Gibson’s work and “updated” the language and spelling so the contemporary church will have his work again for family use.  Bishop Gibson’s booklet included several prayers not included in the Family Prayer Offices published in the 1928 American and 2003 REC Prayer Books.  Additionally, since the ACNA 2019 Proposed Book of Common Prayer will only include an abbreviated form of Family Prayer based on the 1979 Episcopal Prayer Book, my work will hopefully serve as a supplement.

But wait, that’s not all!” Also included in my book will be the Godly Prayers originally attached to the 1559 and later editions of the classic Books of Common Prayer, but not formally considered a part of the Prayer Book.  I have also edited the language and spelling as needed and hope it will prove a useful resource for families, small groups, individuals, and the church at large.

Finally, I have edited and enlarged much of my work on this blog to serve as a bit of a “how to” guide in starting family prayer.  Hopefully, it will prove to be of some use, but the real gems are the two works on prayer that are being edited and republished.  More details on a publication date will be posted later.