Rev. Jefferies Response Re: ACNA 2019 BCP & Prayer Book Society USA’s Updated 1662 BCP

Glad to see Rev. Jefferies respond and do so on the same outlet that has mainly hosted as the battlefield of opinion on the new ACNA 2019 BCP, The North American Anglican.

A few items worth noting:

Some priests and theologians might explain the prepositions in the sacramental rites as causative, some as promissory, but in either case, we can all pray the same prayers. This was the theological genius of 1662.

. . .

And, certainly, the 1662 has strengths that the 2019 does not have. Most definitely. In unity, simplicity, beauty, the 1662 easily beats 2019.

Agree on all counts, which is why I hate to see us lose common prayer with so many options and would have rather seen an updating of the 2003 REC BCP as the baseline instead of “Starting from what is known and nearly-ubiquitous (the 1979 structures etc) . . . .”

I agree that some things have been lost that were in the 1662, but I don’t think they are the core — which I would argue is theological — of the legacy of the 1662.

I would disagree here. Losing language like “miserable offenders” in the daily office confession is excising theological language while adding additional prayers for the faithful departed does reflect minimizing one aspect of Anglican theology (original sin) while emphasizing a theology of remembrance for the dead. Likewise, it is unfortunate that the classic, short prayer book catechism (the basic requirement for confirmation and admission to Holy Communion) is not retained while additional daily offices are included and the word “regeneration” is made optional.  Such losses do not render the ACNA 2019 BCP a deviation like the 1979, but I do lament not restoring what was loss in the 1979 BCP. This was a crucial opportunity to restore what American Anglicanism loss and while the end result is a solid step in the right direction, but not a full restoration.

This makes the Prayer Book Society – USA’s recent announcement in publishing a new edition of the 1662 BCP with minor alterations to make it more global in usage quite interesting. Additionally, the United Episcopal Church of North America recently voted at National Council to allow usage of the 1662 BCP and a deanery has been formed in CANA West that will solely use the 1662 BCP.  Although personally, I prefer retaining the American inheritance of our 1892/1928 BCP and adapting it to conform to the 1662 (Athanasian Creed restored, Luther’s Flood Prayer restored, etc.). Hence, I remain a broken record for the 2003 REC BCP and REC Modern Language BCP, which does this but could still have been improved upon slightly in the modern language aspect.

. . . the BCP 2019 is un-apologetically an inheritor of the 1979 BCP and the Liturgical Movement it participated in . . .

. . .

. . . in a world indelibly shaped by the Liturgical Movement, . . .

Which is quite a shame, considering the errors spurred by Dix and the resulting Liturgical Movement. (See pages 1-2 here for more.)

A point of clarification, before closing out, the letter states:

That it could be approved both by John Cosin AND Richard Baxter, even though these two men had very different theological convictions; Indeed, the 1662 is clearly what we might with hindsight call a via media between those who emphasized the reformed aspect of their reformed catholicity, and those who emphasized the catholic heritage within that same description.

However, Richard Baxter was a nonconformist in part due to the 1662 BCP being enforced in the Act of Uniformity (1662), so the 1662 BCP is not exactly the “via media” between Bishop Cosin and Baxter but I agree the 1662 prayer book is truly representative of “reformed catholicity.”

This is why I support the traditional language version that ACNA Liturgy Task Force member Jacob Hootman has drafted, namely due to the restoration of prayer book language previously disregarded, and not because it is in traditional language.  I continue to urge readers to write the ACNA Liturgy Task Force and show your support for this project. Perhaps the ACNA BCP will once again restore some of the loss language and we can catechize those raised on the 1979 BCP with the reformed catholicity our forefathers professed and passed onto us in the historic liturgies and in the Articles of Religion.

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Returning to the Old Paths: A Traditional (and Restored) Language ACNA BCP

The ACNA blogosphere and social media has been dominated by the new kid on the block, the ACNA 2019 Book of Common Prayer. Meanwhile, I overlooked an emerging project to render the 2019 BCP into the language of Cranmer.  But this isn’t simply a Rite I job on the ACNA prayer book, instead, it is actually restoring key language. Exhibit A, from the Daily Office Confession:

We have left undone those things which we ought to have done, and we have done those things which we ought not to have done; and there is no health in us.

What you may notice is the omission of “and apart from your grace” preceding “there is no health in us.” This was an addition to the 2019 ACNA BCP that Professor Samuel Bray took to task over at the North American Anglican.

Now enter Exhibit B, also from the confession:

But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us, miserable offenders.

Ah, there it is. Miserable Offenders unite.

It is my understanding this project has the blessing of the Liturgy Task Force (there is a rubric allowing for traditional language in the ACNA BCP).  There is potential this work will be published officially by the ACNA with the College of Bishops’ blessing. I hope some of the changes to the classic canticles are also reversed and for heaven’s sake, put the Opening Sentences, well, in the opening of the offices.  Also, based on my use of the ACNA BCP when compared to using the 2003 REC BCP offices, it would be a huge and simple improvement to place the supplemental canticles and seasonal antiphons within the text of the offices to prevent from needlessly flipping several times during the offices.  When using the 1928 BCP or 2003 REC BCP I have found a congregation does not miss a beat so long as you print the page number in the bulletin for the canticles that will be used in the service or simply announce “turn to page x” and read the title of the canticle being read/sung next.  It is far easier to tell a congregation to skip a page or two on an optional canticle than jump to the back and hold your place in the office and then pick up where you were without confusing someone (see, I can be “missional”!).

It is with great joy that the twenty and thirty somethings have been pushing for this project (and I do believe Jacob Hootman, who spearheads this project was not yet nineteen when he started this work!).  Please contact the Liturgy Task Force AND the College of Bishops and let them know you support the project and want the restoration of important, classical Anglican language.

My wish list for this noble project would include restoring the simple, yet theologically heavy, classic catechism as it can be memorized and truly provides a new Anglican with the core of what is necessary for confirmation. This is not meant to degrade the ACNA Catechism as we do need their longer catechism to educate persons in a post-Christian society, but for the purpose of ensuring each confirmand knows what is key prior to confirmation the shorter catechism is better-suited and is based on the model of St. Cyril’s Catechetical Lectures (the Lord’s Prayer, the 10 Commandments, and the Creed).  Perhaps merely re-adopt the 1928’s Offices of Instruction would suffice since it is a liturgy for the entire church to recite and learn the catechism together (something we recently did at Anglican Church of the Good Shepherd). Additionally, instead of noting Ash Wednesday and Good Friday “are encouraged” for fasting, it would be important to note that these are required days of abstinence and all Fridays are days for fasting to keep within the prayer book tradition. If my memory serves me correctly, the American prayer books dropped the requirement in the 1662 BCP, in the “Concerning the Service of the Church”, requiring “And all Priests and Deacons are to say daily the Morning and Evening Prayer either privately or openly, not being let by sickness, or some other urgent cause.”  This should be restored in this traditional language version as a requirement for the clergy in a rubric before the major daily offices.

Please note, I am not opposed to contemporary language prayer books as I submitted my proposals to the task force, but I do believe words have meaning and excising words or providing additional contextual language comes dangerously close to crossing the boundaries of revision to revisionism. I do not believe the Liturgy Task Force had any intent of the latter and this traditional language ACNA BCP project provides the opportunity to ensure ACNA “not move the ancient landmark that your fathers have set” (Proverbs 22:28) but instead to “Stand by the roads, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way is; and walk in it, and find rest for your souls.” (Jeremiah 6:16).

ACNA 2019 BCP Finalized

You can review the final text on the website.  Unfortunately, the Family Prayer section continues to follow the 1979 TEC BCP and did not incorporate the reforms I proposed based on the 1928 BCP, which in turn was based upon Bishop Edmund Gibson’s original work.

Additionally, the ACNA Liturgy Task Force did not restore “miserable offenders” to the general confession in the daily office.  I am genuinely curious what the task force thoughts were regarding the feedback it received prior to the deadline last November.

I will refrain from rendering a judgment until after I have a copy to review and use it for a sufficient period of time. Based upon the trial texts it is an improvement on the 1979 TEC BCP, but I must continue to lament that the task force did not start with the 2003 REC Modern Language BCP and then work from there in adding services where needed.  Then the BCP could have been kept relatively small and additional services could have been published as a Book of Occasional Services, which the REC has done and was common in the past.

One last note, since women’s ordination has not been addressed by ACNA, it is curious the 2019 BCP would be formerly adopted since the Ordinal would need to be amended if ACNA restores a male-only priesthood and/or diaconate.

Great Article on Family Prayer and an Announcement

The Rev. Dcn. Parker has authored a brilliant article on utilizing the full version of the daily offices but in an abbreviated manner (as allowed by the rubrics) to better facilitate family prayer.

The readers of this blog will recall my focus on using the Catechism, Family Prayer, 39 Articles, and other sections of the 1928 American and 2003 REC Prayer Books to facilitate family devotions.  As Dcn. Parker points out, Bishop Edmund Gibson authored a booklet of family devotions that were minimally adopted in creating the Family Prayer Offices in the 1928 American and 2003 REC Prayer Books.  These offices are greatly abbreviated and lack liturgical responses that would be more engaging for the family.  However, the abbreviated version of the full daily offices Dcn. Parker writes about do include responses that are more engaging for the entire family (or church small group for that matter).

I fully endorse and strongly recommend families use the abbreviated office that Dcn. Parker references in his article.  He is to be commended for “doing the math” and condensing the office (as allowed by the Prayer Book) into a shorter form and publishing this office for the church to use within their home.  A copy of the condensed office may be found at the bottom of the article at The North American Anglican or here.

Speaking of Bishop Edmund Gibson and his work, Family Devotion; or an Exhortation to Morning and Evening Prayers in Families, I have submitted for publication a book that takes the abbreviated daily offices and prayers from Bishop Gibson’s work and “updated” the language and spelling so the contemporary church will have his work again for family use.  Bishop Gibson’s booklet included several prayers not included in the Family Prayer Offices published in the 1928 American and 2003 REC Prayer Books.  Additionally, since the ACNA 2019 Proposed Book of Common Prayer will only include an abbreviated form of Family Prayer based on the 1979 Episcopal Prayer Book, my work will hopefully serve as a supplement.

But wait, that’s not all!” Also included in my book will be the Godly Prayers originally attached to the 1559 and later editions of the classic Books of Common Prayer, but not formally considered a part of the Prayer Book.  I have also edited the language and spelling as needed and hope it will prove a useful resource for families, small groups, individuals, and the church at large.

Finally, I have edited and enlarged much of my work on this blog to serve as a bit of a “how to” guide in starting family prayer.  Hopefully, it will prove to be of some use, but the real gems are the two works on prayer that are being edited and republished.  More details on a publication date will be posted later.

Miserably offended by “miserable offenders”

Professor Samuel L. Bray recently highlighted in his article, “‘And (Apart From Your Grace) There is No Health In Us’ Weighing the merits of a liturgical revision“, that the proposed ACNA Book of Common Prayer has qualified the classical prayer book phrase “there is no health in us” in the daily office General Confession.  I commend his well-researched article to everyone and hope the ACNA Liturgy Task Force will heed his advise and simply retain the clause “And there is no health in us” without qualification.

Today I write regarding a different clause that has been excluded altogether from the same General Confession found in the order for both morning and evening prayer.  The (in)famous clause, “miserable offenders,” follows directly after the line “And there is no health in us” in the classical prayer book.  However, in the proposed ACNA daily office General Confession, the line simply says “O Lord, have mercy upon us.”  It omits the following clause, “miserable offenders” and follows the language (or lack thereof) found in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, Rite One General Confession.

This omission is in need of correction. I applaud the ACNA Liturgy Task Force in restoring, albeit with qualification, the line “there is no health in us” but suggest they also restore the full language of the clause following it: “O Lord, have mercy upon us, miserable offenders.”  The term “miserable offenders” identifies humanity for precisely what we are and explains why we are asking for mercy from the Creator.

Additionally, no less a luminary than C.S. Lewis cautioned against the liturgical revisionism in his day and urged the retention of the very same clause in his essay, “‘Miserable Offenders’ An Interpretation of Prayer Book Language.”  In the words of the immortal Lewis:

ONE of the advantages of having a written and printed service, is that it enables you to see when people’s feelings and thoughts have changed. When people begin to find the words of our service difficult to join in, that is of course a sign that we do not feel about those things exactly as our ancestors. Many people have, as their immediate reaction to that situation the simple remedy — “Well, change the words” — which would be very sensible if you knew that we are right and our ancestors were wrong. It is always at least worth while to find out who it is that is wrong.

This brief essay is a must read for laity and liturgists alike.  “Modernizing” language or omitting language that is offensive to the modern mind also results in changing the theology of the Church’s rule of prayer.  The use of the term “miserable offenders” in the context of asking the Lord to have mercy upon us strikes home the fact that there is truly “no health in us” and, as Lewis explains, we are miserable as we are to be pitied for the state of affairs we find ourselves. This is exactly why we are asking for the Lord’s mercy.

Indeed, after this cry for mercy upon miserable offenders such as ourselves, the General Confession turns to asking God to forgive those who are penitent.  The confession ends with a request that we may repent and then turn to the Lord for restoration and assistance in living “a godly, righteous, and sober life” to glorify His holy Name.  But unless we realize the depths of our sinfulness, how can we truly ask for repentance and restoration?  It is precisely because we are miserable offenders without any health in us that we need repentance in the first place.  Furthermore, because of where we find ourselves, we are in desperate need for the Lord’s help in turning towards a godly, righteous, and sober life.

If you agree with restoring “miserable offenders” to the daily office general confession then please contact the ACNA Liturgy Task Force immediately at liturgytaskforce@anglicanchurch.net as they are quickly closing the time period for further comments and edits to the proposed ACNA 2019 BCP.

Teach Your Children Well

As the head of the family should teach them in a simple way to his household.

– Luther’s Small Catechism

And all Fathers, Mothers, Masters, and Mistresses, shall cause their Children, Servants, and Apprentices, who have not learned their Catechism, to come to the Church at the time appointed, and obediently to hear and to be ordered by the Minister, until such time as they have learned all that is here appointed for them to learn.

– U.S. Book of Common Prayer, Catechism, 1928

The duty of the head of the household is to teach the family the catechism of the church.  The catechism is not important in and of itself but is only insofar as it reflects the teaching of Scripture.  Fortunately, both Dr. Martin Luther and the catechism in the Book of Common Prayer are firmly rooted in Scripture.

Both catechisms focus on the ancient requirement that catechumens learn the Ten Commandments, the Apostle’s Creed, and the Lord’s Prayer.  The Ten Commandments are learned first to announce the law by which we have all fallen short.   The Apostle’s Creed and Lord’s Prayer are taught next to proclaim the good news that Christ has accomplished what the law requires.  In other words, law and Gospel.

It is important that fathers or the head of the household raise their children in the faith:

“Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. You shall love the LORD God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.

– Deuteronomy 6:4-7

“Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.”

– Ephesians 56:4

Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.”

– Proverbs 2:6

At first glance, the Book of Common Prayer may appear to rest the responsibility of catechesis on the church, but let’s reexamine the wording of the relevant rubric more carefully:

And all Fathers, Mothers, Masters, and Mistresses, shall cause their Children, Servants, and Apprentices, who have not learned their Catechism, to come to the Church at the time appointed, and obediently to hear and to be ordered by the Minister, until such time as they have learned all that is here appointed for them to learn.

The requirement that children learn from the local minister is not a universal command, but is contingent on those who have failed to memorize and understand the contents of the prayer book catechism.  When the father or head of household neglect their duty to catechize their children only then are they are required to send their children to the church to be taught the catechism by the resident clergyman.  This implies that the preferred and expected scenario is one in which the father has taught his children the catechism.

Unfortunately, many Christian parents neglect their duty to God, the church, and their own children by failing to teach them the faith.  The Book of Common Prayer’s catechism can and should be used by families to train their children to become disciples of Christ.  Additionally, the 1928 U.S. Book of Common Prayer contains several flexible and easy-to-use condensed daily offices to teach doctrine, encourage Bible reading, and teach the faith.  This section is known as the “Forms of Prayer to be used in Families” at pages 587-600 of the 1928 BCP.  (I have submitted my slightly modernized version with expanded content from Bishop Edmund Gibson to the ACNA Liturgy Task Force for their consideration in including in the 2019 ACNA BCP project.  If this proposed text is beneficial, please let the Liturgy Task Force know by contacting them.).

Reviewing the catechism provides a solid Biblical and theological foundation for children.  Additionally, teaching the catechism ensures that the children can be confirmed as members of the church and begin receiving Holy Communion.  The catechesis of children provides them with a library of information they can rely upon as they grow in faith.  Likewise, when asked about their faith, such as “what is a sacrament,” they will have a ready answer: “an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace given unto us; ordained by Christ himself, as a means whereby we receive the same, and a pledge to assure us thereof.”  In theory, they will be able to draw upon the wisdom of the church and have an answer regarding the basic facts of Christianity.

Teaching the catechism can be tailored to suit a child’s age and learning level.  Beginning with regular family prayer and including the memorization of one of the Ten Commandments, reciting the Apostle’s Creed, and praying the Lord’s Prayer is a great start.  Over time, the Ten Commandments will be memorized and the Creed and Lord’s Prayer will become second nature.  After learning the Ten Commandments, the Creed and Lord’s Prayer provide more than enough material to review in detail.  The bite-size theology within the Creed and Lord’s Prayer can easily be expanded upon when explaining to children, much less adults.  Eventually, the theological meat of the rest of the catechism can be broached as children advance to school-age.

It is our duty to discipline, or disciple, our children in our faith.  If we truly believe that God has revealed His love for us sinners through His Son then we not only need to share this good news but raise our children to know and understand these facts.  The catechism is not merely a tool to disciple our children but also a requirement for those of us within Anglicanism.  As parents, we would not fail to educate our children as to hygiene, nutrition, or the sciences.  Why then should we neglect to teach them the riches, depth, and joy of God’s mercy in providing for our salvation and the redemption of the world?

A Slightly Updated 1928 BCP Offices for Family Prayer

The Anglican Church of North America (“ACNA”) Liturgy Task Force has released a draft entitled Daily Devotions for Families for trial usage before the anticipated adoption of the ACNA 2019 Book of Common Prayer.  While the brief (six pages) selections of prayer is commendable, it is extremely brief when compared to the fourteen pages dedicated in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer’s “Forms of Prayer to be used in Families” .

The proposed ACNA offices include extremely shortened forms for morning, noon, evening, and compline prayers. The 1928 BCP however includes two shortened versions of morning and evening prayers that mimic the formal and longer offices. It also includes a variety of “Additional Prayers” that can be used as needed.

The following is a slight modification to these prayers that will be submitted to the ACNA Liturgy Task Force to ensure family devotions and oratories (like Prattville Anglican Fellowship) have the resources they need to grow. If you have any suggestions, edits, or additions please feel free to comment and of course let the Liturgy Task Force know here.

Updated 1928 BCP Office for Family Prayer

MORNING PRAYER.

The head of the household having called together the Family says the following with all kneeling, and repeating with him the Lord’s Prayer.

Let us pray:

OUR Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

Here may follow the Collect for the day.

¶ Here may follow the Daily Lectionary reading from the Old and New Testaments.

¶ Here may follow the Daily Lectionary reading of the Psalter, read responsively.

Acknowledgment of God’s Mercy and Preservation through the Night.

ALMIGHTY and everlasting God, in Whom we live, move, and have our being; We, your needy creatures, give your our humble praises, for your preservation of us from the beginning of our lives to this day, and especially for having delivered us from the dangers of the past night. For your mercies, we bless and magnify your glorious Name; humbly asking you to accept this our morning sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving; for the sake Him who lay down in the grave, and rose again for us, your Son our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Dedication of Soul and Body to God’s Service.

Since it is of your mercy gracious Father that another day is added to our lives; We here dedicate both our souls and our bodies to your service, in a sober, righteous, and godly life. We ask you merciful God to confirm and strengthen us; that, as we grow in age, we may grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

But God, who know the weakness and corruption of our nature, and the many temptations which we daily meet; We humbly ask You to have compassion on our infirmities, and to give us the constant assistance of your Holy Spirit; that we may be effectually restrained from sin, and incited to our duty. Imprint upon our hearts such a dread of your judgments, and such a grateful sense of your goodness to us, as may make us both afraid and ashamed to offend You. And, above all, keep in our minds a lively remembrance of that great day, in which we must give a strict account of our thoughts, words, and actions to Him whom you have appointed the Judge of quick and dead, your Son Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

¶ Here may follow a hymn, canticle, or the Apostle’s Creed

For Grace to guide and keep us the following Day,
and for God’s Blessing

We implore Your grace and protection for the ensuing day. Keep us temperate in all things, and diligent in our several callings. Grant us patience under our afflictions. Give us grace to be just and upright in all our dealings; quiet and peaceable; full of compassion; and ready to do good to all men, according to our abilities and opportunities. Direct us in all our ways. Defend us from all dangers and adversities; and be graciously pleased to take us, and all who are dear to us, under your fatherly care and protection. These things, and whatever else You shall see to be necessary and convenient for us, we humbly beg, through the merits and mediation of your Son Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior. Amen.

THE grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with us all evermore. Amen.

EVENING PRAYER.

The head of household with all the Family kneeling, and repeating with him the Lord’s Prayer.

Let us pray:

OUR Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

Here may follow the Collect for the day.

¶ Here may follow the Daily Lectionary reading from the Old and New Testaments.

¶ Here may follow the Daily Lectionary reading of the Psalter, read responsively.

Confession of Sins, with a Prayer for Contrition
and Pardon.

Let us silently confess our sins before Almighty God.

* Here let him who reads make a short pause, that every one may secretly confess the sins and failings of that day.

MOST merciful God, who are of purer eyes than to behold iniquity, and has promised forgiveness to all those who confess and forsake their sins; We come before You in an humble sense of our own unworthiness, acknowledging our manifold transgressions of your righteous laws.* But, O gracious Father, who desire not the death of a sinner, look upon us, we ask you in mercy, and forgive us all our transgressions. Make us deeply aware of the great evil of them; and work in us a broken and contrite heart; that we may obtain forgiveness at Your hands, who art ever ready to receive humble and penitent sinners; for the sake of Your Son Jesus Christ, our only Savior and Redeemer. Amen.

 

Prayer for Grace to reform and grow Better.

AND prior to our own frailty, or the temptations which encompass us, we be drawn again into sin, protect us through the direction and assistance of your Holy Spirit. Reform whatever is amiss in the temper and disposition of our souls; that no unclean thoughts, unlawful designs, or wrongful desires, may rest there. Purge our hearts from envy, hatred, and malice; that we may never allow the sun to go down upon our wrath; but may always go to our rest in peace, charity, and good-will, with a conscience void of offence towards you, and towards men; that so we may be preserved pure and blameless, unto the coming of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

The Intercession.

Accept O Lord, our intercessions for all mankind. Let the light of your Gospel shine upon all nations; and may as many as have received it, live as becomes it. Be gracious unto Your Church; and grant that every member of the same, in his vocation and ministry, may serve you faithfully. Bless all in authority over us; and so rule their hearts and strengthen their hands, that they may punish wickedness and maintain your true religion and virtue. Send down your blessings, temporal and spiritual, upon all our family, friends, and neighbors. Reward all who have done us good, and pardon all those who have done or wish us evil, and give them repentance and better minds. Be merciful to all who are in any trouble; and do administer to them according to their needs; for the sake of He who went about doing good, Your Son our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

¶ Here may follow a hymn, canticle, or Apostle’s Creed

The Thanksgiving.

TO our prayers, O Lord, we join our sincere thanks for all your mercies; our life, our reason, and all other gifts of soul and body. We thank you Lord for our health, friends, food, clothing, and all the other comforts and conveniences of life. Above all, we adore Your mercy in sending Your only Son into the world, to redeem us from sin and eternal death, and in giving us the knowledge and sense of our duty towards You. We bless You for your patience with us, notwithstanding our many and great sins. We bless You for all the directions, assistance, and comforts of Your Holy Spirit; for Your continual care and watchful providence over us through the whole course of our lives; and particularly for the mercies and benefits of the past day. We humbly ask you to continue your blessings to us, and to give us grace to show our thankfulness in a sincere obedience to Your laws, through whose merits and intercession we received them all, Your Son our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Prayer for God’s Protection through the Night following.

IN particular, we ask you to continue your gracious protection to us this night. Defend us from all dangers and from fear that we may enjoy refreshing sleep for the duties of the coming day. And grant us grace always to live in such a manner that we may never be afraid to die; so that, living and dying, we may be Yours through the merits and satisfaction of Your Son Christ Jesus, in whose Name we offer up these our imperfect prayers. Amen.

THE grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with us all evermore. Amen.

On Sundays, and on other days when it may be convenient, it will be proper to begin with a Chapter, or part of a Chapter, from the New Testament.

 

 

A SHORTER FORM OF THE DAILY OFFICES:

MORNING.

After the reading of a brief portion of Holy Scripture, let the Head of the Household, or some other member of the family, say as follows with all kneeling, and repeating with him the Lord’s Prayer.

OUR Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

LORD, our heavenly Father, Almighty and everlasting God, Who has safely brought us to the beginning of this day; please defend us with Your mighty power; and grant that this day we not fall into sin, neither run into any kind of danger; but that all our doings, being ordered by Your governance, may be righteous in your sight; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

¶ Here may be added any special Prayers.

THE grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with us all evermore. Amen.


EVENING.

After the reading of a brief portion of Holy Scripture, let the Head of the Household, or some other member of the family, say as follows with all kneeling and repeating with him the Lord’s Prayer.

OUR Father, who art in heaven, Hallowed be thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, On earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, But deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

Enlighten our darkness, we beg you O Lord; and by Your great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the love of your only Son, our Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Here may be added any special Prayers.

THE Lord bless us and keep us. The Lord make his face to shine upon us, and be gracious unto us. The Lord lift up his countenance upon us, and give us peace, this night and evermore. Amen.

 


ADDITIONAL PRAYERS

For the Spirit of Prayer.

ALMIGHTY God, who pours out on all who desires the spirit of grace and of supplication; Deliver us, when we draw away to your from coldness of heart and wanderings of mind, that with a diligent mind and heart we may worship You in spirit and in truth; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

In the Morning.

GOD, the King eternal, who separated the day from the darkness, and turns the shadow of death into the morning; Drive far off from us all wrong desires, incline our hearts to keep Your law, and guide our feet into the way of peace; that having done Your will with cheerfulness while it was day, we may, when the night arrives, rejoice to give You thanks; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

ALMIGHTY God, who alone provided us the breath of life, and alone can keep alive in us the holy desires you do impart; We ask You for your compassion’s sake, to sanctify all our thoughts and endeavors; that we may neither begin an action without a pure intention nor continue it without your blessing. And grant that, having the eyes of the mind opened to behold things invisible and unseen, we may in heart be inspired by your wisdom, and in work be upheld by Your strength, and in the end be accepted by You as Your faithful servants; through Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.

At Night.

LORD, support us all the day long, until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes, and the busy world is hushed, and the fever of life is over, and our work is done. Then in your mercy grant us a safe lodging, and a holy rest, and peace at the last. Amen.

GOD, who are the life of mortal men, the light of the faithful, the strength of those who labor, and the repose of the dead; We thank you for the timely blessings of the day, and humbly supplicate your merciful protection all this night. Bring us, we ask you, in safety to the morning hours; through Him who died for us and rose again, Your Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Sunday Morning.

GOD, who makes us glad with the weekly remembrance of the glorious resurrection of Your Son our Lord; Provide us this day such a blessing through our worship of your, that the days to come may be spent in Your service; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For Quiet Confidence.

GOD of peace, who has taught us that in returning and rest we shall be saved, in quietness and in confidence shall be our strength; By the might of Your Spirit lift us, we pray to your presence, where we may be still and know that You are God; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For Guidance.

GOD, by whom the meek are guided in judgment, and light rises up in darkness for the godly; Grant us, in all our doubts and uncertainties, the grace to ask what You would have us to do, that the Spirit of Wisdom may save us from all false choices, and that in Your light we may see light, and in Your straight path may not stumble; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For Trustfulness.

MOST loving Father, who wills us to give thanks for all things, to dread nothing but the loss of you, and to cast all our care on you and who cares for us; Preserve us from faithless fears and worldly anxieties, and grant that no clouds of this mortal life may hide from us the light of that love which is immortal, and which You have manifested to us in Your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

HEAVENLY Father, You understand all Your children; through Your gift of faith we bring our confusion to the light of your wisdom, and receive the blessed encouragement of your sympathy, and a clearer knowledge of your will. Glory be to You for all Your gracious gifts. Amen.

For Joy in God’s Creation.

HEAVENLY Father, who has filled the world with beauty; Open, we as You, our eyes to behold your gracious hand in all your works; that rejoicing in your whole creation, we may learn to serve you with gladness; for the sake of Him by whom all things were made, Your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For the Children.

ALMIGHTY God, heavenly Father, who has blessed us with the joy and care of children; Give us light and strength so to train them, that they may love whatsoever things are true and pure and lovely and of good report, following the example of their Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

For the Absent.

GOD, whose fatherly care reaches to the ends of the earth; We humbly ask you graciously to behold and bless those whom we love, now absent from us. Defend them from all dangers of soul and body; and grant that both they and we, drawing nearer to you, may be bound together by your love in the communion of your Holy Spirit, and in the fellowship of your saints; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For Those We Love.

ALMIGHTY God, we entrust all who are dear to us to your never-failing care and love, for this life and the life to come; knowing that you are doing for them better things than we can desire or pray for; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For the Recovery of a Sick Person.

MERCIFUL God, giver of life and health; Bless, we pray You that Your servant, [N.], and those who administer to him of your healing gifts; that he may be restored to health of body and of mind; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For One about to undergo an Operation.

ALMIGHTY God our heavenly Father, we ask You graciously to comfort Your servant in his suffering, and to bless the means made use of for his cure. Fill his heart with confidence, that though he be sometime afraid, he yet may put his trust in Your; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For a Birthday.

WATCH over Your child, O Lord, as his days increase; bless and guide him wherever he may be, keeping him unspotted from the world. Strengthen him when he stands; comfort him when discouraged or sorrowful; raise him up if he fall; and in his heart may your peace which passes understanding abide all the days of his life; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

 

For an Anniversary of One Departed.

ALMIGHTY God, we remember this day your faithful servant [N.], and we pray that, having opened to him the gates of larger life, you will receive him more and more into your joyful service; that he may rest, with You and Your servants everywhere, in the eternal victory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

For Those in Mental Darkness.

HEAVENLY Father, we ask you to have mercy upon all your children who are living in mental darkness. Restore them to strength of mind and cheerfulness of spirit, and give them health and peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For a Blessing on the Families of the Land.

ALMIGHTY God, our heavenly Father, who places us in families; We place in your continual care the homes in which your people dwell. Put far from them every root of bitterness, the desire of vainglory, and the pride of life. Fill them with faith, virtue, knowledge, temperance, patience, godliness. Knit together in constant affection those who, in holy wedlock, have been made one flesh; turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to the fathers; and so enkindle fervent love among us all, that we be endued with brotherly love; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

For all Poor, Homeless, and Neglected Folk.

GOD, Almighty and merciful, who heals those that are broken in heart, and turns the sadness of the sorrowful to joy; Let Your fatherly goodness be upon all that You have made. Remember in pity those that are destitute, homeless, or forgotten of their fellow-men. Bless the congregation of your poor. Uplift those who are cast down. Mightily befriend innocent sufferers, and sanctify to them the endurance of their wrongs. Cheer with hope all discouraged and unhappy people, and by your heavenly grace preserve from falling those whose extreme poverty tempts them to sin; Although they be troubled on every side, let them not be distressed and though they be perplexed, save them from despair. Grant this, O Lord, for the love of Him, who for our sakes became poor, Your Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

For Faithfulness in the Use of this World’s Goods.

ALMIGHTY God, whose loving hand has given us all that we possess; Grant us grace that we may honor you with our substance, and remembering the account which we must one day give, may be faithful stewards of Your bounty; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

A General Intercession.

GOD, at whose word man goes forth to his work and to his labor until the evening; Be merciful to all whose duties are difficult or burdensome, and comfort them concerning their toil. Shield from bodily accident and harm the workmen at their work. Protect the efforts of sober and honest industry, and allow not laborers to be defrauded. Incline the heart of employers and of those whom they employ to mutual forbearance, fairness, and goodwill. Give the spirit of governance and of a sound mind to all in places of authority. Bless all those who labor in works of mercy or in schools. Care for all elderly persons, all little children, the sick and the afflicted, and those who travel. Remember all who by reason of weakness are overtasked, or because of poverty are forgotten. Let the sorrowful sighing of the prisoners come before You; and according to the greatness of Your power, preserve those that are appointed to die. Give ear unto our prayer, O merciful and gracious Father, for the love of Your dear Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Grace before Meat.

BLESS, O Father, Your gifts to our use and us to your service; for Christ’s sake. Amen.

GIVE us grateful hearts, our Father, for all Your mercies, and make us mindful of the needs of others; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.