The Multivocational Life

The Anglican Church in North America has always embraced planting missions across the continent. Archbishop Robert Duncan began his tenure pressing the Anglican 1000 initiative, with the goal of planting 1,000 parishes within ten years. Archbishop Foley Beach took up the mantle with his Always Forward initiative and now Presiding Bishop Ray Sutton (Reformed Episcopal Church) has rolled out REC 100 – with a goal of 100 new REC parishes .

As you can imagine, there are a lot of church planters or potential church planters in ACNA. Perhaps you know one? Or maybe you are one. Well this little post is hopefully one of encouragement for those of you sojourning as a missionary or is informative for those considering taking the plunge. If you are neither one then I hope it spurs you to pray for your friends who are engaged in what I call the multivocational life.

Why not bivocational? Well for one, many of us who are serving missions are living a trivocational or more life. But the multivocational life is more than where one finds their paycheck. The multivocational life is not unique to mission priests (or in my case, mission deacon) but is truly what every Christian lives. We have our family, our spouse, our career(s), our volunteer work, etc. Every aspect is a different vocation to different people – so congratulations – you already live a multivocational life my friend!

But living the multivocational life in the mission context is often a miserable existence of being overextended but telling yourself “I’m multitasking.” No you’re not. You’re majoring in the minors or simply failing to finish any given project before you.

Read the rest here.

Monastics, Every One of Us

In the midst of life we are in death; of whom may we seek for help, but you, O Lord, who for our sins are justly displeased?

The Committal, ACNA Book of Common Prayer, 2019, page 260

 

The selected quote may also be found in the Anthem to the Holy Saturday service, on page 579 of the same prayer book. It is fitting that we should proclaim together those words heard at every Anglican funeral on Holy Saturday so that we may remember that our God, our Lord, our King, went to His own death so that He may “trample down death by death” as the ancient Eastern Paschal chant puts it so beautifully. Times such as we find ourselves – a time of pandemic, plague, and pestilence – should make us turn to prayer and therefore to our prayer books. But alas, the prayer book people have deserted their prayer books for far too long.

Read the rest at The North American Anglican.

Holy Week in the Domestic Church

Superb resource as many worship from their home during Holy Week.

The Homely Hours

I can hardly believe that Palm Sunday is in a few days. This is going to be a very brief post sharing what we have available here on this site to help us celebrate Holy Week at home this year.

holyweekimagesFamily Prayer for Holy Week and Easter

Last year, I put together a this family prayer booklet  to help families go through the collects and events of Holy Week. It’s essentially family prayer from the 1928 Prayer Book. The suggested readings follow the events of each day of Holy Week. I’m also going to print out the images above. I formatted an image a day with the collect for the day and we will look at the painting during our family prayer time. I’ll then display it on our “little oratory” throughout the day.

Here is the Holy Week Family Prayer Booklet (and here it is as a PDF…

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Holy Week at Home: A Pandemic Guide

A must read during these interesting times we live in.

The Homely Hours

Thank you to Jay and Emelie Thomas for putting together this guide to Holy Week at Home. We are grateful to be able to share something tailored specifically for this year, in addition to the resources we already have. Jay and Emelie are young parents who are constantly learning how to “raise up their children in the way they should go” through the historic rhythms and practices of the Church. They both hold degrees in English Literature from the U.S. Naval Academy. Jay is a Postulant in the Special Jurisdiction of the Armed Forces and Chaplaincy (ACNA), and both Emelie and Jay are resident in the Anglican Diocese of Christ our Hope. 

The COVID-19 Pandemic has brought with it an uncannily sheltered and isolated Lenten season. Many have commented that it is perhaps appropriate that we have endured this societal fast during a season of fasting. Although we do…

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Ministers, Be Prepared

Preach the Word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort, with all longsuffering and teaching.

2 Timothy 4:2 (NKJV)

St. Paul commended Timothy to always preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Timothy was discipled by his master to constantly and vigilantly be prepared to teach the Word of God regardless the season, the circumstance, and the adversity.

Read the rest at The North American Anglican.

Antecommunion: What, Why, and How?

The Saint Aelfric Customary

Something we’ve touched upon here before is the subject of the service of Antecommunion. I figured it’s about time we revisit that idea with a more direct address of its identity, purpose, and execution.

What is ‘Antecommunion’?

The prefix ante- means ‘before’, so the service of Antecommunion is the Service of Holy Communion before, or leading up to and excluding, the actual celebration of Communion.  Basically from the Introit to the Offertory, this is the non-sacramental part of the Communion liturgy.  The only difference is that this is done on purpose, and ends with a few different prayers, making this specifically the Service of Antecommunion rather than the Service of Holy Communion Except We Stopped Short Just Before The Important Bit.

Why would anyone do this?

Antecommunion is a uniquely Anglican practice; I’m not sure if any other tradition has ever had a liturgy on the books like this.  In…

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COMMON AUTHORITY IN THE MIDST OF UNCOMMON PRAYER

The advent of the ACNA 2019 Book of Common Prayer raises an important question: what authority does it have in comparison with the other historic Books of Common Prayer? After all, the 1979 Episcopal Book of Common Prayer varies from the 1928 Book of Common Prayer not merely in liturgical form but also in doctrine and rubrics. For example, the classic prayer book requirement that none be admitted to communion unless they are confirmed or “ready and desirous” of the same is omitted in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer and the baptismal service shifts its focus from regeneration to initiation. Indeed the 2019 Book of Common Prayer also lacks this requirement, although it has restored confirmation to a rite that is required for Anglicans and not optional.

What then should an ACNA Anglican look to when trying to discern how to act when the 2019 ACNA BCP is silent? After all, the prior authorized prayer books (including the 1979) remain authorized for use in ACNA, so there is certainly conflict between the 1928, and 1979 BCP’s. What is an Anglican to do?

Read more here: http://northamanglican.com/common-authority-in-the-midst-of-uncommon-prayer/

Now available: another episode of the “Miserable Offenders” podcast on “Knowing God in the Liturgy” by Peter Toon

Prydain

From our friends at The North American Anglican, here is the latest episode of their podcast, Miserable Offenders.  In this episode, Deacon Andrew and Jesse pick up the reading and discussion of Peter Toon’s “Knowing God Through The Liturgy” which can be found at New Scriptorium (http://newscriptorium.com/toon-collection ). They note “As always, we digress and bring the insight of Toon into our present situation.”  As always this is worth listening to!

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Moving to TNAA

It’s official, I’m moving the blog to The North American Anglican. Don’t worry, the old blog posts will remain here and I may have the occasional post here if it isn’t something that fits under the mission of The North American Anglican.

You up can find my first post at this link. Be sure to subscribe to new posts over at The North American Anglican so you don’t miss out.

Thank you for reading my posts over the years. I saved this WordPress domain in 2007 and finally started blogging in 2013. It is hard to believe it has been almost exactly six years since that first blog post. The journeying in a strange land continues and I hope to see you there as we keep walking towards the final rest.

Now available: the next episode of the “Miserable Offenders” podcast on “Knowing God in the Liturgy” by Peter Toon

Prydain

From our friends at The North American Anglican, here is the latest episode of their podcast, Miserable Offenders.  In this episode, Deacon Andrew and Jesse discuss the recent heated debates over the 2019 ACNA Book of Common Prayer and eventually turn back to the Toon text for answers.  If you have been following those debates, this is certainly worth hearing.

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